Treasure These Words On Choppy Seas

(season 5 episode 1)

Could Business Jazz get into the Guinness Book of Records?

Longest single episode of a podcast?

This episode is all about Chris Brogan’s #My3Words.

Context & timing are important in every business.

Business Jazz Podcast probably wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for Chris Brogan’s weekly newsletters.

Three words that act as your guides for the year…

http://www.chrisbrogan.com is where you can find Chris Brogan’s three words – every year since 2006.

Put your three words in your diary so you see them every day …

Make them your screensaver …

Have them tattooed …

Make a new business card each year with your words on them …

You hear Roger & Paul discussing Paul’s three words

[Strava & Runkeeper = running Apps Roger uses.]

“Planning Quality Moments” – Roger’s three words.

Roger creates a huge amount in his work – but if you just create in a vacuum that’s not good enough.

Planning is an on-going process.

“I’m going to start seriously planning stuff” says Roger.

You hear Roger describe how he allocates his time.

Moments:
I want to focus more on being ‘in the moment’…

How golfers stay in the zone for small bits of time …

“My time is getting progressively more valuable to me” says Roger.

Quality:
Making sure I do the best work I can with the resources available to me …

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Why do you think anyone could benefit from this approach?

Your words won’t make you feel bad, they nudge you along.

The year is going to be “choppy waters” – the words help you think on your feet, make decisions, remain flexible …

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You can find Paul and Roger at “ShowandTellCommunications.net

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Being Blind to Gender is Foolish

(season 4 episode 7)

Note: This episode was live streamed via Periscope.

You hear Roger Overall somewhere in British Columbia, Canada – talking with Paul O’Mahony in his kitchen in Cork Ireland.

There’s a short conversation about Canada

First Nation people

Then a few words about Jane Boyd.

Jane Boyd, a previous host (“leading lady”) on Business Jazz, has lost her voice.

Somehow Paul & Roger started discussing gender …

Gender balance is what Paul favours.

He got fed up of panels of man. The Chinese Communist Party leadership is all men.

“Is a business more attractive to you if … ?

“Who are the customers of the business? If you serve a mixed gender popular…

Able to put out messages from both segments of your ‘target audience’..

“There can be some awful women – as well as some awful men…

Paul says “I hate stereotyping … The women I’ve met pay more attention to detail

Gay men pay more attention to detail…

Boards of companies to be more representative …

Roger – you could say I don’t care …

I’d have to be some sort of rank idiot …

You could be a hard-nosed business person

I want my daughter to self-actualise…

“Do you thank ?

“The problem is we agree with each other … boring old liberals …

I’m going to adopt a position to draw you out:

Policy level … asserting their own points of view

Women have been so excluded their ability to stand up for their point of view is weak … Men get to shout women down …

it’s a waste of time to put women on the Board…”

Our daughters are well able to express their points of view…

All other things being equal

I’d go for a dim women … there would be a variety a dim people.

all sorts of different personalities

Belbin on team roles (1980s) … not one particular types of

Several types of intelligence

Q1 Why do I feel so strongly that diversity of gender is an advantage? Where’s my evidence… 50/50 companies out perform

Iceland: Gabrella … photography project feminisation of the banking culture …

we need more of female approach …

combat these male dominated institutions …

Paul testosterone is the problem …

Men in suits got excited … bankrupted the country

You might as well hand it over to women they couldn’t do any worse

Your problem …

men have more balls for …

we don’t have evidence of women in decision-making positions

I was only talking about Boardrooms

Women are the dominant force…

CEOs suffered from types of paranoia

We agree women are capable of making decisions

haven’t had access to power & authority

women are capable of ‘exercising the upper hand’

To be genuinely

you don’t want to be accused of mysogeny

systematic

could be seen as a form of mysogeny.

Dismissing …

A point of view – I don’t recognise gender I only recognise talent

Paul has programmed himself to see gender balance & skin colour

Some say they’re blind to gender …

How do they mean that?

Roger was the only man among 40 people … in a house…

Paul there’s a fundamental problem in education – vast majority of e ch ed

I would favour quotas …

absence of male role models results in negative consequences.

Gender quotas – Paul is in favour of quotas for parliament …

This is different to any previous episode …

BusinessJazz.net for Paul & Roger.

If you found this useful …

Paul the male

“You’ve been listening to two men debating the gender issue.”

Brand Canada is attractive

A special episode (season 4 episode 6)
Recorded in a car travelling in Vancouver Canada – Roger Overall with Jane Boyd. (born on Vancouver Island)

This is “Not a commercial for Vancouver.”

Brand Canada is discussed.

Brand Canada – Roger’s perceptions of Canada before he arrived.
Edmonton connection.

  • Canadian Mounties, on a horse – honorable,
  • Integrity.
  • Ultra-marathoner Gary Robbins story – reinforced the idea of being Canadian.
  • Don’t forget the “natural beauty & wide open spaces” of Canada.

Jane & Roger discuss Roger’s perceptions of Canada – now that he’s spend time in Canada:
Looking forward to coming back.
Extraordinary “Welcome home” said Bob, Jane’s husband – this welcome seemed to be an expression of Brand Canada.

The marathon story reinforces Roger’s perception of brand Canada:

  • Roger ran a race, came in last
  • Everyone waited for him to finish
  • Very kind, supportive people
  • Well tended, maintained city – a clean place
  • Vancouver appeals to many people – does not disappoint.

Differences from what he expected: Roger does his best to highlight

  • Many similarities with USA.
  • Big trucks
  • Peculiar blend of New England, original England, Holland & Texas
  • Differences in pronunciation of words.

Didn’t expect such a melange.

In relation to Brand Canada,
Jane Boyd highlights:

  • Asian population
  • Off-shore investment
  • Indigenous culture, very diverse country
  • Not all melting into one culture
  • Universal health care
  • Different from USA and rest of world – but “we have a long way to go“.

Brand Canada falls down: 

  • Everyone’s aware of what happened to native Indians in USA
  • People think First Nation peoples have been treated well in Canada
  • Residential schools
  • Children taken from their families, to “give them culture“.

–  Jane is ashamed of how indigenous peoples were treated.

There is

  • Truth & reconciliation Commission in Canada.

Generosity as a brand identifier

Jane’s brand identifier is Generosity – an element of that must come from being Canadian.
We apologise a lot.” Quick to own up – go forth to make it right – make amends

Making mistakes in business:

  • Can you be more confident that your mistake will be accepted
  • Do you feel nervous about coming clean?

Personal & business ethics
sometimes it’s hard to own up but it’s the right thing to do.” When you own up it makes the customer feel better.

In Canada “we care about people. We take care of the vulnerable. We have poverty & homelessness. But we believe in taking care.” – says Jane Boyd.

In Vancouver, the largest credit union in Canada is nearby – socially responsible businesses.

Personal Story:
What a glove-making company did for Jane’s dad. And he didn’t retire until he was 78.

“A lot of companies are doing right for their people.”

The conversation ends with reference to two other brand identifiers:

  • Halloween – a US thing. – “trick or treat”
  • Canadians wear a poppy – worn for Remembrance Day

You can find Jane Boyd at www.45Conversations.com

Roger Overall at www.businessjazz.net & www.showandtellcommunications.net

Roger says he’ll be back in Vancouver in February 2018.

 

Catastrophes are highly desirable

Podcasting from Cork Ireland
Paul O’Mahony & Roger Overall
discuss disasters.

Recorded in Republic of Work, Cork City centre.

The podcast starts with Roger & Paul describing what happened the last time they recorded the podcast.

A disaster.

The episode was lost : the recording equipment failed.

That ‘catastrophe’ led to discussion about

“What should a company do when it has a major failure?”

All businesses have failures
– you have to pick yourself up (2:30)

What to do when you have a major disaster (a huge screw-up) – and you want to remain genuinely attractive?

BusinessJazz-S4E5-Cartoon-StarWars (2)

There’s evidence that when things go wrong – providing you recover well – you become even more attractive to customers. (3:20)

People think you’re human
We all fail.
But because of the way you recovered…

Your client is a human being as well.

You can easily imagine the worst.
However, the reaction may not be anger – may be one of understanding.

Roger’s story about his father’s mistake. How he learned from the experience. “What are we going to do about it?” – this is the big question. (6:45)

When this is the focus
(1) Employee doesn’t feel so horrible, they can continue to do their job
(2) No energy is wasted on feeling bad, shouting – all energy is directed to solving the problem.

There is slight reference to “A no – blame culture”. (8:00)

Roger’s big recommendation:

There are three questions that need to be asked when things go wrong

(1) Why did it happen?
(2) What have you learned from what went wrong?

(At Business Jazz – we had a faulty kit, we weren’t monitoring the audio, there was an intermittent fault. We weren’t monitoring the audio throughout the whole podcast.

(3) How do we move on? What’s our action plan?

(At Business Jazz, we had a ‘small’ problem – we moved on before we sorted the problem and that led to a much bigger problem.)

Paul asks:

What if the disaster is big and the cost of fixing it for ever is too high?
Should you be going out of business? (14:15 )

This led to discussion of
– Example of travel to Mars…
– Use of Disclaimers
– Insurance to cover failure to deliver.

Plus even more discussion of the experience Roger had with Air Canada & Aer Lingus – on his way to Vancouver, Canada.

The cost of guarantees

Aer Lingus wasn’t able to guarantee …

Big praise for Heathrow Airport website is excellent : tells you how to transfer. (19:00)

Big emphasis on the importance of really good clear information – presented in a friendly language.

Go to Heathrow.

Paul & Roger say they’ll put the Air Canada email up in shownotes.

Paul sent a tweet with a link to the last episode of Business Jazz to Air Canada – but there’s no guarantee the CEO got it.

Humourous chat about Air Canada.

Any other disasters? (24:50)

Exxon Valdez oil spill is discussed.

Elevator pitch: New TV program Roger would like to make.

Roger tells ” Do nothing – let the sea clean up”
Better than throwing chemicals over the oil. Adding to polution.

Oil is of nature – not synthetic.

“We’re not here to tell people how to clear up an oil slick”

How to communicate that to the public in a way that will persuade the public you’re being responsible:

1. Be seen to be doing something
2. Do what you can for wildlife
3. Educate people (For example: Why do you think we’re transporting oil?)

What caused the oil spill?
A meteorite fell to earth theory

If you have thoughts about oil spills, please get in touch

An experiment to try at home: Spill olive oil on water & clean it up.
Roger’s tip – use lemon juice

Contact us please at BusinessJazz.net.

How to seduce your ideal client

This episode of Business Jazz Podcast is (mainly) about :

How to do an elevator pitch to the CEO of your ‘ideal potential client’.
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Podcasting from Cork Ireland
Paul O’Mahony & Roger Overall talk about
how to be genuinely attractive in business today
(GAIBT).

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There is no perfect way. You need to find your best way.

There are some essentials & some desirables.

You must

  • find out how to get in touch with the person afterwards
  • ensure they know how to contact you (if they want to).

BusinessJazz-S4-E4-Cartoon-800px (3)

Give us an example of a successful elevator pitch you’ve done Paul

Paul’s elevator pitch story: 
to an advertising agency director.
Paul eavesdropped on a conversation during a coffee break at a conference in Dublin. (The person in the queue was a director of Arks “one of Ireland’s longest-established agencies, with billings of £21 million (€27 million) in 1999 – up from £6 million in 1996”.)

The Guinness stout account was once held by Arks for more than 20 years.

What Paul did led to a contract to provide services to the agency – presentation skills training courses for account managers & creatives.

Learning:
A queue for coffee’s a great place to take the first step – to make a “memorable splash“.

P&R speculate how Michael Lynch AV3 Media (for example) could make a ‘memorable splash’ – introducing AV3 Media to new potential clients.

PLEASE NOTE:
The topic of Elevator Pitches emerged as a surprise during this podcast. P&R don’t decide beforehand what they’re going to focus on.
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A ‘business development’ news story :
ShowandTell Communications is in a situation.
Another podcast team are
(1) in difficult  & (2) looking for advice

Asked for advice, S&T offered a solution. The solution involved offering to do some work (audio-editing) – for free.

Because S&T want to be seen as genuinely attractive 

Our No 1 aim at Business Jazz Podcast is to
(1) Be Useful to Show&Tell Communications (our parent company)
[and equally at the same time]
(2) Be Useful to other businesses

That’s why we offered a trial – one piece of work – valuable but not a huge service.

Why a Trial period is a good idea: 
A trial piece of work. The advantage to both parties – being able to stop without losing face – time to get to know each other & see whether both like working together.

In this case, it’s important to clarify the quality of the audio-editing needed – before quoting or agreeing a fee for the service.

You’ll hear lots of chat about editing audio – the tricky work involved in removing background sounds – how it can take a long time to remove sounds entirely.

[There’s short reference to sound of Theresa May coughing at Tory Party Conference.]
______________________

Contact Paul & Roger on www.businessjazz.net
– if you’d like to follow up on anything on this podcast.

Please tell someone about this podcast

30 Reasons to reply quickly

Paul O’Mahony & Roger Overall [P&R]
– podcasting from Cork, Ireland –
talk about how to be genuinely attractive in business today (GAIBT).

Recorded in @RepublicofWork The Mall, Cork City centre.

The podcast recording was live streamed on Periscope.

P&R discuss:

(1) A serious approach to branding.
What is your brand? It’s what others expect from your business.
“This is what you are in the mind of others…”

P&R emphasise the importance & value of doing research to find out what your business is in the minds of others –
research may surprise you.

(2) What if a business can’t afford to do research about its brand?

(3) Roger tells a story about his plans to travel from Cork to Vancouver – via Aer Lingus & Air Canada.

Paul is shocked by Air Canada.

What happened:
Roger emailed both Aer Lingus & Air Canada to find out about his luggage. He expected a poor, slow response from Aer Lingus. He expected a top class response from Air Canada.

Brand Canada is strong, much stronger than Brand Aer Lingus – in Roger’s expectations.

The shocking thing
is that Air Canada sent an email :

“We will respond to you within 30 working days.”

You hear Paul cracking-up. Paul says it’s like someone calling a fire brigade and getting a reply – “thanks for your call, we’ll be with you within 30 working days.”

BusinessJazz-S4-E3-Cartoon (1)

P&R (Paul & Roger) decide :
“Let’s send this podcast to CEO of Air Canada Calin Rovinescu”

Next time Paul books to fly Air Canada he expects a reply “we expect to be able to collect you within 30 days of your booking date.”
Horrific story – almost unbelieveable.

(In case you’re wondering, Aer Lingus sent a reply that left Roger in some doubt – but at least it was an honest answer that sounded as if they couldn’t provide an absolute guarantee that nothing would go wrong.)
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Part Two:

Paul & Roger (P&R) chat about

(1) An understanding of what a brand is. Many miss the point that “I don’t have control over my brand.

(2) A book: “Markets are conversations” – the No 1 thesis in “The ClueTrain Manifesto” (1999).
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P&R summarise key points from their conversation:

  • You need to have a huge interest in the expectations people already have.
  • Strong Brands discourage some people from being interested in their products & services (saves people from wasting their time). An Undertaker doesn’t want to be confused with Pizza parlour.
  • It’s good to “Be Ignorant” about what other people think
  • Don’t base your understanding & decisions on
    (1) an unrepresentative sample
    (2) what you fear people are saying

Your company values:
Consider

  • You can control the extent to which you behave in line with your values.
  • Your values can’t be changed without changing the Board, the hiring policy, the people.
  • You may gradually need to ditch some of your clients – in order to move to working with your “ideal clients”.

Many companies have “values” – value statements. But statements are not what matter most – behaviour is what people base their expectations on.

Paul tells story about a company he once worked for whose No 1 value was FUN
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P&R summarise the Key Points from this week’s episode.

(Bitcoins get a brief mention)

EIR brand is an elephant or a tanker – slow to change. It’s in a market that’s high tech – fast – nimble. P&R say there’s a “phenomenal mismatch” between Eir’s brand and the market in which they aim to succeed.

“If your No 1 value is X – why do you do Y?
“If that’s your No 1 value – why are you doing that?

The ClueTrain Manifesto : “Markets are conversations” is highly recommended

Paul & Roger would like you to contact them via BusinessJazz.net

Our ABOUT US page

Important Note:
Big thanks to Jane Boyd in Vancouver for contacting us about our “About Us” Page: she pointed out that it’s out of date.

Sometimes you really do screw up – even when your heart is in the right space.

Please tell someone about Business Jazz Podcast.

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